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Unfair to Accuse Egypt and Jordan of 'Hypocrisy' in Not Accepting Gazans



Recently, criticism and accusations of 'hypocrisy' have been directed towards Egypt, Jordan, and other Arab nations for not accepting the inhabitants of Gaza into their nations. However, it is crucial to recognize these countries' significant efforts in hosting refugees from various war-torn regions.


Jordan, in particular, has provided sanctuary to millions of refugees, granting some of them citizenship and equal benefits. Meanwhile, Egypt has extended humanitarian aid to Gaza, awaiting the opportunity to offer further assistance.


It is crucial to understand the sensitivity of the situation and avoid unfairly burdening Arab countries with the entire responsibility of resolving the Israel-Hamas conflict.

It is crucial to understand the sensitivity of the situation and avoid unfairly burdening Arab countries with the entire responsibility of resolving the Israel-Hamas conflict.


According to the UN Refugee Agency (UNHCR), Jordan hosts refugees from Iraq, Yemen, Sudan, Somalia, and other nationalities, including Palestine and Syria. It makes a total of 730,000 individuals, making Jordan one of the countries with the highest refugee population per capita. This indeed places enormous pressure on the country and its host communities.


Over the years, millions have sought safe haven in Jordan, with many being granted citizenship and enjoying equal rights and benefits.

Jordan's efforts in accommodating refugees should not be overlooked or undermined.


When it comes to Egypt, Abdul-Fattah El-Sisi has demonstrated his commitment to assisting Gaza by offering humanitarian aid.


In times of conflict, Egypt has positioned trucks at the Rafah border, ready to provide necessary supplies while baldly waiting for Israel to permit the passage. Many a time, Israel doesn't cooperate.


Last week, Egypt kept 200 trucks ready carrying 3,000 tons of aid to help the people of Gaza; however, only 20 trucks were allowed in.



Considerations for Egypt and the Region


The Gaza Strip is home to around 2 million people. While it may seem logical for neighboring countries like Egypt to accommodate them, certain concerns arise.

One concern is the potential for a significant portion of the population to decide not to return to Gaza after the conflict ends, leading to a situation similar to the Nakba in 1948, where displaced Palestinians never returned home.


Another concern is the possibility of Israel's annexation or occupation of parts of Gaza. It may even lead to another level of territorial dispute for the next 50 years.


Moreover, the concerns of extremism and security cannot be ignored.


Arab countries, including Egypt, have spent years combatting the influence of Islamist extremist groups like the Muslim Brotherhood.

If Hamas were to infiltrate Egypt along with Gazans, it could use Egyptian territory to launch attacks on Israel. In response, Israel might retaliate by targeting Egyptian territory, which could ignite further conflicts and wars in the Middle East.


Arab countries, including Egypt, have spent years combatting the influence of Islamist extremist groups like the Muslim Brotherhood. Eventually, they could breathe a sigh of relief. Importing the consequences of the Israel-Hamas conflict into the region would undermine their efforts and destabilize the area.



Shared Responsibility


While Arab countries do not tolerate Hamas and the Muslim Brotherhood, Western countries host these Islamist ideologues in the name of 'freedom of expression.' The Muslim Brotherhood today doesn't operate from the Middle East but from the West.


Moreover, it is crucial to recognize that rallies and protests in support of Hamas and Palestinian Jihad are more prevalent in the West than in the Middle East.

Therefore, both Western nations and Arab countries need to work collaboratively to find a solution for the people of Gaza. Placing the entire burden on Arab nations is unjust and disregards the shared responsibility of addressing the conflict's root causes.


Hence, it is essential to understand the complex dynamics at play and avoid oversimplifying the situation. All stakeholders, including Western nations and Arab countries, should share the responsibility to find a resolution.


By working together, a more comprehensive and sustainable solution can be achieved, ensuring the well-being and security of all parties involved.


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Zahack Tanvir is a Saudi-based Indian national. He is the Director of London-based The Milli Chronicle Media. He holds a Master's degree in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning (AI-ML) from Liverpool John Moore University. He did a certificate program in Counterterrorism from the University of Leiden, Netherlands. He tweets under @ZahackTanvir. Views expressed are personal.

 



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